Ep # 91: The Hiking Middle Class & Perspectives on Perspectives This month on TFS 

The Familiar Strange · Ep # 91: The Hiking Middle Class & Perspectives on Perspectives This month on TFS Welcome back to the Familiar Strange!  This week is Familiar Stranger Ruonan’s first panel as a host! We think she did pretty well! Ruonan is joined this week by Familiar Strangers Alex, Andy and Irina!  Alex … Continue reading Ep # 91: The Hiking Middle Class & Perspectives on Perspectives This month on TFS 

Book Review: ‘Ethnicity and Democracy in the Eastern Himalayan Borderland’

In the book Ethnicity and Democracy, Mona Chettri offers a rich ethnography originating from fieldwork conducted in three EH borderland areas: Darjeeling (India), Sikkim (India), and Ilam in East Nepal. These three areas were traditionally seen as continuous cultural landscapes bounded by fluid and porous borders, defining trade, livelihood, and everyday life in the region. Chettri’s book is one of the first few works to identify the continuous yet discrete nature of Darjeeling, Sikkim, and East Nepal. Invoking the EH as a conceptual, geographical, and political space, Chettri offers a new framework within which questions of ethnic revivalism, ethnic politics, representation, political and economic vagaries, and political rights across these regions can be analysed. 

Do Not Adjust Your Dial (Ep. #18 Re-release)

Apologies strange familiars. We had some technical difficulties this morning and you might have noticed an podcast briefly go out this morning that wasn't supposed to. Just a few behind-the-scenes hiccups. We will return you to your regular programming shortly. In the meantime, here's a re-release of one of our personal favourite episodes. "Livestock are … Continue reading Do Not Adjust Your Dial (Ep. #18 Re-release)

Living with Long COVID: A Reflection

As a COVID long-hauler, I inhabit a liminal space of intractable uncertainty with regards to diagnosis, treatment, recovery, and prognosis. COVID infections have blurred the boundary between the two kingdoms of the well and the sick. A new biosocial identity has emerged from the collective experience of long Covid on a global scale, where we exist ‘betwixt and between’ yet belong to neither kingdom.