Ep #73 Corporate Clapbacks and Twisting Traditions: This Month on TFS

The Familiar Strange · Ep #73 Corporate Clapbacks and Twisting Traditions: This Month on TFS This week we bring you another panel in our new format! This time, we’re diving into the conflict between Amazon and its workers in Alabama trying to form a union. Clair raises the topic of “corporate sassiness” and how we … Continue reading Ep #73 Corporate Clapbacks and Twisting Traditions: This Month on TFS

Holding Belief in Suspense

Some months ago, I went for an early morning run with a mate at my fieldsite. After a short trot together, she left for work, and I decided – against all advice from my adopted Aboriginal family and many others – to put off my fieldnotes and continue a few more kilometres on the road alone. A short way up, I saw in the distance a lone figure seemingly dancing about on the road. I was all at once entranced, curious, astonished, and frightened. I turned and returned speedier than ever before!

Ep #72 Weaponised Photography & Sex Work: Camille Waring on Online Intimacy & Lens Based Violence

The Familiar Strange · Ep #72 Weaponized Photography & Sex Work: Camille Waring on Online Intimacy & Lens Based Violence Before we dive into today’s episode we’d just like to add a content warning for this episode for sexual assault.  This week, Familiar Stranger Carolyn sits down with Camille Waring from the University of Westminster. Camille … Continue reading Ep #72 Weaponised Photography & Sex Work: Camille Waring on Online Intimacy & Lens Based Violence

What Is Your Worth? Re-evaluating Human Work in An Automated Future

A while ago I read something on Twitter that got me thinking. The tweet read something along the lines of: “What kind of sci-fi dystopia are we living in where robots taking all our jobs is considered a problem?” A slightly more positive spin on this is: “The problem isn't that robots are taking over our jobs, the problem is that we've created a world where that's somehow a bad thing.” These feel like somewhat glib responses to increasingly complex questions about inequality and automation; however, what they actually ask are fundamental questions about what we value and how we structure society. In essence: “Why should we work?”