Ep #72 Weaponised Photography & Sex Work: Camille Waring on Online Intimacy & Lens Based Violence

The Familiar Strange · Ep #72 Weaponized Photography & Sex Work: Camille Waring on Online Intimacy & Lens Based Violence Before we dive into today’s episode we’d just like to add a content warning for this episode for sexual assault.  This week, Familiar Stranger Carolyn sits down with Camille Waring from the University of Westminster. Camille … Continue reading Ep #72 Weaponised Photography & Sex Work: Camille Waring on Online Intimacy & Lens Based Violence

What Is Your Worth? Re-evaluating Human Work in An Automated Future

A while ago I read something on Twitter that got me thinking. The tweet read something along the lines of: “What kind of sci-fi dystopia are we living in where robots taking all our jobs is considered a problem?” A slightly more positive spin on this is: “The problem isn't that robots are taking over our jobs, the problem is that we've created a world where that's somehow a bad thing.” These feel like somewhat glib responses to increasingly complex questions about inequality and automation; however, what they actually ask are fundamental questions about what we value and how we structure society. In essence: “Why should we work?”

Ep #71 Entrepreneurism in Academia and Ethics on The Ground: This Month of TFS

The Familiar Strange · Ep #71 Entrepreneurism in Academia and Ethics on The Ground: This Month of TFS This week on TFS, the Strangers continue with our new panel format and dive deeper into the topics of entrepreneurism and ethics. They talk about how universities and by extension academia is becoming more and more business-like … Continue reading Ep #71 Entrepreneurism in Academia and Ethics on The Ground: This Month of TFS

Boob Boxes: Post-Mastectomy Prosthetics and the Artifice of Breast Cancer

I chose to go flat. But I almost wasn’t allowed to. This is largely due to the unacknowledged psychological tension that underlies deeply gendered illnesses: that it is possible to have one’s gender or sex taken away by disease or disability; literally eaten by cancer and its aftermath. The sick person is then framed as one who has been robbed of the “natural” trappings of motherhood, wife-dom, and feminine sexuality. The aesthetics of breast cancer therefore remained fixated on a loss of idealized womanhood.